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JAMMER ART – Eggs

by , under Awesome Jammer Art, Jammer Art

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Hooray for Commander Chillywolf, Blossom Sunnyviolet, Arctic Wolf, Little Magiclilly, and Precious Glambelle! They we’re chosen for this week’s Jammer Snaps featuring eggs!

Each year on the Monday after Easter in Haux (pronounce like ‘how’), France, a giant omelet is served.

Don’t forget a fork if you’re in this southern French town on Easter Monday. Each year a giant omelet is served up in the town’s main square. And when we say giant, we mean giant! It’s brunch for up to 1,000 people. Last year’s enormous dish was just shy of 10 feet in diameter and was comprised 5,211 eggs, 21 quarts of oil, and 110 pounds each of bacon, onion, and garlic.

This tradition arises from a story of when Napoleon and his army were traveling, and they stopped in Haux and ate omelets. Napoleon was such a fan of his that he asked everyone in Haux to gather their eggs and make a huge omelet for his army.


CREATURE FEATURE – Bat Ray

by , under Creature Feature

Tierney Thys talks to us about the ‘bat ray’ from her indoor touch pool.

Rays are more closely related to sharks than to fish. Like sharks they don’t have any bones, and their skeleton is made of cartilage. Bat rays prefer the warm shallow waters of the North American Pacific Coast, but are different species of rays are found through out the world’s warm ocean shores. The bat is a small ray coming in at about a six foot fin span and about 200 pounds. The largest of the rays is the manta. These guys have can have a 24 foot fin span and weigh 3000 pounds!! Rays will live about 25 years in the wild and over 50 in captivity.

Have you played the Touch Pool mini-game in Tierney’s Aquarium?


RIM – Rare Leaf Necklace

by , under Rare Item Monday

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Check out this Rare Leaf Necklace in lavender for this weeks Rare Item Monday!

Plants and trees require two things in order to bud in the spring. A fixed number of ‘cold days’ and a specific temperature.

Days and temperatures vary between species but the count is exact. How they actually know is one of sciences great mysteries.

Notice that I don’t say time.

For example if an oak tree needs 45 cold days, and a temperature of 50 degrees it won’t bloom until it gets all 45 cold days, regardless of temperature. If we have an especially cold December and unusually warm January, the tree may have all of it’s cold days and will bloom early if we hit a warm enough temperature. If it’s a mild winter with not a lot of cold days the tree may not get all of its cold days until April.