AJHQ+A – Whales

Snowflake Daringwolf asks Tierney ‘how much can whales weigh?’ in this week’s AJHQ+A.

Have you ever wondered how whales sleep? Since whales breathe air like we do, they need to come to the surface even when they’re sleeping. Whales ‘sleep’ with only half of their brain at a time. One half stays awake to keep the whale breathing and aware of any danger, while the other half rests.

Some whales can live to be 200 years old or more! There may be whales alive that are even older. Unfortunately it’s very difficult to tell how old a whale is while it is still alive. And usually when they die they sink to the ocean floor where it is very difficult for us to study. But there may be whales in the ocean that were alive before electricity was invented. Whoa!

JAMMER TIP – Giraffes Are Back!!

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Giraffes are back in Jamaa!! They’ve traveled far and wide and have lots of tales to tell.

There’s only one species of giraffe, and they are only native to Africa. They have different spots depending on which part of the country they live. They are the reticulated, Nubian, Uganda or Baringo, Masai, Angolan, and the southern. All giraffes have two furry little horns called ossicones.

Giraffes drink little water and only eat acacia leaves. They get most of the water they need to survive from the leaves. They’ve adapted this way because when they are drinking they are extremely vulnerable as this is the only time predators can stage an attack. But they’re generally not worth the effort as they have very keen eyesight, can kill with a kick, and their skin is extremely tough to chew making them more work then their worth.

JAMMER ART – Eggs

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Hooray for Commander Chillywolf, Blossom Sunnyviolet, Arctic Wolf, Little Magiclilly, and Precious Glambelle! They we’re chosen for this week’s Jammer Snaps featuring eggs!

Each year on the Monday after Easter in Haux (pronounce like ‘how’), France, a giant omelet is served.

Don’t forget a fork if you’re in this southern French town on Easter Monday. Each year a giant omelet is served up in the town’s main square. And when we say giant, we mean giant! It’s brunch for up to 1,000 people. Last year’s enormous dish was just shy of 10 feet in diameter and was comprised 5,211 eggs, 21 quarts of oil, and 110 pounds each of bacon, onion, and garlic.

This tradition arises from a story of when Napoleon and his army were traveling, and they stopped in Haux and ate omelets. Napoleon was such a fan of his that he asked everyone in Haux to gather their eggs and make a huge omelet for his army.